‘Silafanda – a gift to you on behalf of my journey’ Labé, Fouta Djallon Highlands, Guinea

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Kola nut vendor, Labé market © Jason Florio - Fouta Djallon Highlands, Guinea-Conakry

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Kola nut vendor, Labé market © Jason Florio - Fouta Djallon Highlands, Guinea-Conakry

Random post of the day:

Silafando: is the traditional way to greet village chiefs in The Gambia and Senegal. In Guinea-Conakry, on our most recent expedition, we found out that the tradition was exactly the same there but they used the word ‘Silafanda’.

During both the ‘A Short Walk in the Gambian Bush – 930km African odyssey’ and the ‘River Gambia Expedition – 1000km source-sea African odyssey‘, despite turning up unannounced, each village chief (the ‘Alkalo‘) that we met would kindly permit our raggle-taggle, road or river-weary, team to pitch our small camp every evening.

This was because we showed due respect, as strangers, when approaching the alkalo, by using the age-old tradition and protocol called ‘silafando’ – which roughly translates as ‘a gift to you on behalf of my journey’. This gift is often a handful of the bitter kola nuts. These walnut-sized nuts play an important role in West African culture and traditional social life. Once accepted, the chief would then share the nuts with his most important village elders. They break open and chew the nuts – valued for their pharmacological properties – which act as a natural stimulant and, apparently, an aphrodisiac.

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© Jason Florio – The Gambia, West Africa. ‘A Short Walk in the Gambian Bush

We were then warmly welcomed into the village and, from that point on, everyone knows that you are there as guests of the alkalo -  ensuring that you are treated with respect, as strangers, for the duration of your stay in the village. And, if any of the villagers dare to disrespect his guests, they would have the chief to answer to – along with the shame it would bring to their family.

Helen presents the ‘Silafando’ to the village chief in the Fouta Djallon Highlands of Guinea-Conakry. As you will see, it is often a lengthy process – particularly in this case, because we had to explain to the chief (and get permission) why we wanted to visit the source of the River Gambia – a sacred site, very near to his village

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Youtube: Helen presents kola nuts to the village chief, Fouta Djallon Highlands. Film © Jason Florio & Helen Jones-Florio. Click here or on above image to view footage